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Benjamin L. Willis
"Ben"

Company A-2

12 Jun 1938 - 9 Apr 2017

Place of Death: Atlanta, GA

Interment: TBD

It is with great regret and sorrow that we must notify you of the death of our Classmate, Ben Willis, on April 9, 2017, in Atlanta, GA after a valiant battle with pancreatic cancer.

Ben has no immediate survivors.

A Celebration of Life Memorial Service will be held Saturday, April 22 at 2 pm at North Springs United Methodist Church, 7770 Roswell Road, Sandy Springs, GA.  A reception will follow after the service in the Fellowship Hall.

In lieu of flowers, Ben requested before his death that donations in his memory be made to the Ben Willis Fund, North Springs United Methodist Church, 7770 Roswell Road, Sandy Springs, GA 30350.

Well done, Ben.  Be thou at peace.

Remembrances:

Class Memorial Pages\A-2 Ben Willis.pdf

I attended the memorial service today  in Sandy Springs GA for our classmate Ben Willis, who died last week of pancreatic cancer. Ben was a life long bachelor with four tours on Vietnam and many decorations for heroism. I learned that the last 30 years of his life were essentially devoted to good works with his church and community. The people at his church obviously loved him. It showed for sure. Other classmates there were Joe Stringham, Frank Egan, and Don Sawtelle.

Bren Battle

Obituaries:

WILLIS, Benjamin Louis "Ben" June 12, 1938 to April 9, 2017 Born in Bay Minette, Alabama, Ben attended the local high school, playing football as a cornerback and lineman. He attended West Point Military Academy, graduating in 1961. While there, he was awarded a Brigade boxing championship and played football for 3 years. "Col Ben" had a distinguished career in the army including 4 tours of duty in Vietnam as an Airborne Ranger in the 101st Infantry. He served under General Colin Powell among other high ranking military leaders. Achieving the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, he was awarded numerous medals and commendations, including Bronze and Silver Stars. After military retirement, he worked with private industry in environmental cleanup and as a private investigator. Ben experienced a major change in his life after God led him to North Springs Methodist Church. He became a faithful servant leader there, touching many lives for Christ. He was the self-appointed kitchen and fellowship director, known for his "almost famous" pork BBQ with all the fix'ns. Ben's interests included: Crimson Tide Football, organizing church Red Cross Blood Drives (becoming state leader in most pints from churches), fishing, reading, national politics, sports cars, planning events, poker, an occasional fine cigar, cooking, and friendship in numerous circles. Ben was preceded in death by his parents, Ester May and Newnan F Willis Sr, a brother Newnan F Willis Jr. and sisters Helen Willis Richardson, Jean Willis Calvert and Ann Willis. He leaves behind his extended family of cousins, nieces and nephews, the family of Kathleen Askins, friends from his growing up years in Bay Minette, and a huge faith and military family. He will be remembered for his curmudgeonly, if not straightforward ways, his sense of humor, concern for others, and his faith for which he tirelessly toiled. A memorial service and celebration of Ben's life will be held at 2:00 pm on Saturday, April 22, 2017 at North Springs Methodist Church, 7770 Roswell Rd, Sandy Springs, GA 30350, 770.396.0844. A reception will follow the service in the church Fellowship Hall. Ben requested memorial donations be made to the North Springs United Methodist Church. There will also be a memorial Red Cross Blood Drive to be held this summer. The church will post details.

Published in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Apr. 16, 2017

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Ben Willis, 78: Warrior for country became servant for church, others

Lt. Col. Benjamin “Ben” Louis Willis (Ret.)

Eight plaques hang at North Springs United Methodist Church as a testament to the congregation’s record Red Cross blood donations.

Ben Willis, the drives’ organizer, knew how to sweeten the appeal for donors. Instead of giving out the standard juice and cookies, Willis had a barbecue sandwich waiting for anyone willing to roll up their sleeves and give blood.

He bought the barbecue with his own money, said the Rev. Sara Webb Phillips, pastor of the Sandy Springs church.

“He felt a passion for that because he had been injured in Vietnam at least a couple of times,” she said.

Lt. Col. Benjamin “Ben” Louis Willis (Ret.) of Sandy Springs, a decorated career military man who served as second-in-command to Gen. Colin Powell in Korea, died April 9. He was 78.

Born June 12, 1938, in the small town of Bay Minette, Ala., Willis had many passions, including his church, sports cars, the occasional fine cigar and Alabama football.

He played cornerback and lineman in high school. He also spent three years playing football at West Point, the U.S. military academy, where he also won a brigade boxing championship and graduated in 1961.

Long after he’d hung up his cleats, Willis would gather with friends in front of a big-screen television to cheer on his beloved Crimson Tide.

In the Army, Willis was known as “Col. Ben.” His service included four tours of duty in Vietnam and a stint as a top aide to Gen. Powell. He received numerous commendations and medals, including the Bronze and Silver Stars, and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

In a statement to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Gen. Powell said Willis was “a great soldier who was my second in command when I commanded an Infantry battalion in Korea in 1973.”

The general said, “He was a tough, but compassionate leader who I counted on during a difficult period when we were transitioning from the conscript to an all-volunteer Army. God rest his soul.”

Powell and Willis had not been in touch for years. But hearing of Willis’ failing health, the general recently called. Willis said they “had a good conversation,” his pastor said.

When asked what they’d spoken about, Willis gave a sly smile and said: “Wouldn’t you like to know,” she said.

Willis worked with private industry in environmental cleanup and as a private investigator after retiring from the military.

His decision to join North Springs 23 years ago was life-changing, Phillips said.

Once a member of the church, “his life just kind of turned around and he started living his life as one of service and one of God,” Phillips said.

One of the ways he expressed his faith “was his amazing care for people who would come to the church and were hungry,” she said.

He also believed strongly that the church should have at least one big event a month, whether it was a dinner, a party or reception. And in his take-charge style, he took responsibility for organizing these events.

For years, he put on a church fish fry. In preparation for the dinners, he would gather rods, reels and some of the men from the church for a fishing trip to Florida, his pastor said.

In more recent years, he came up with the idea of a Hawaiian luau complete with a whole roasted pig and his “almost famous” barbecue, she said.

Longtime church member and friend Tula Burch said she has never “met a man who was more giving to people.”

She said she often spotted him slipping money to people in need.

“He gave most everything he made away,” Burch said. “What a person, right?”

Willis had many friends and passions. Besides Crimson Tide football, he loved fishing, reading, national politics, sporting events, poker, cooking and a good cigar now and then.

The Red Cross blood drives he organized at the church set multiple records for the most pints donated by a nonprofit organization, Phillips said. The church is planning a blood drive in his memory this summer, she said.

Willis was preceded in death by his immediate family: his parents, Ester May and Newnan F. Willis Sr., brother Newnan F. Willis and sisters Helen Willis Richardson, Jean Willis Calvert and Ann Willis.

His survivors include a large extended family of cousins, nieces and nephews.

Willis requested that memorial donations be made to North Springs United Methodist Church.

“He was a tough, but compassionate leader who I counted on during a difficult period when we were transitioning from the conscript to an all-volunteer Army. God rest his soul.”

– Gen. Colin L. Powell

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution 4:58 p.m Thursday, April 20, 2017