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Daniel G. Barney
"Dan"

Company K-1

24 Jun 1939- 30 Oct 2020

Place of Death: Camp Hill, PA

Interment: West Point Cemetery

It is with great regret and sorrow that we must notify you of the death of our Classmates, Dan Barney, on 30 October 2020 in Geisinger Holy Spirit Hospital, Camp Hill, PA. 

Dan is survived by his wife, Pam; their son, Scott; their daughter, Elizabeth; and grandchildren, Alexandra, Casandra, and Azaria. 

Condolences may be sent to Pam at 3 Pointe Place, Carlisle, PA  17013-2720. 

In lieu of flowers, donations in Dan's memory may be sent to St. John's Episcopal Church, 1A N. Hanover Street, Carlisle, PA  17013. 

Dan Barney's funeral will be at 10:00 AM, Tuesday, 23 November 2021, at the West Point Cemetery.  Those attending should meet NLT 9:30 AM at the Visitors Control Center located in the West Point Visitors Center in Highland Falls.

Well done, Dan.  Be thou at peace.

Remembrances:

Class Memorial Pages\K-1 Dan Barney.pdf

Obituaries:

 

Assembly/Taps Memorial Article:

DANIEL G. BARNEY  1961

Cullum No. 23353-1961 | October 30, 2020 | Died in Harrisburg, PA
Cremated. Inurned at West Point Cemetery, NY

Daniel George Barney was born in East Chicago, IN. He excelled at academics, applied to various engineering schools, and received an appointment to USMA in 1957. His goal, he once told his children, was to get out of East Chicago and go as far away as possible. USMA fit both his criteria, and it was free, which mattered because his father became a disabled steelworker in an industrial accident six months after returning to the States from World War II. The elder Barney’s children became his troops. USMA was perfect, and, though Dan didn’t realize at the time, it would end up being his life.

Dan departed for West Point in 1957 and was placed in Company K-1. He once said, “I had my ups and downs at the Academy: I might be the only man in the class with a turn-out star on my bathrobe and stars on my collar at graduation.” He graduated in 1961, completed airborne training, and departed for a tour at the DMZ in Korea, where he was first a platoon leader for Company A, 8th Engineer Battalion and later the assistant division engineer (and a valued member of his bowling team!).

Dan then attended graduate school and earned an M.S. in civil engineering at the University of Illinois. After graduating, he married Pamela Ulery (Goshen, IN) after a courtship of 10 months; she would remain his wife for the next 56 years. Graduate school was followed by training at Fort Belvoir, VA, after which Dan and Pam headed to France, where Dan assumed command of Company B, 83rd Engineer Battalion. France withdrew from NATO in 1966, and Dan and Pam moved to Germany, where their son Scott was born. 

In June 1967, Dan became the area engineer, USAAAG III CTZ, in Bien Hoa, Vietnam, while Pam and Scott moved to Indianapolis, IN for a year. He told his family of helicopters repaired with duct tape, going to the hospital to visit his brother Doug (a Marine injured in action), using bed pans to cook lobsters that were mis-shipped due to some Army mix up, locating his aunt in her Saigon apartment holding a rocket launcher during the Tet Offensive (it was the only weapon left in her finance office), and finding out he had been shot when he went to get a “bug bite” checked after it bothered him for four days. Dan was put in for a Purple Heart but declined, stating, “How would I deserve such an honor when I thought it was a bug bite?” 

After returning from Vietnam, Dan joined USMA academia as a math instructor. He was known as “One-Oh (1.0) Barney” to his struggling math students, as he helped them stay proficient. While at the Academy for four years, their daughter Elizabeth was born, and the family adventures began.

In 1972, Dan and his family left the United States for a two-year assignment in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Dan acted as the single point of contact for the U.S., coordinating the construction to be done in the kingdom. 

In 1974 Dan became the facility engineer for the New York Area Command in Brooklyn, NY. 

In 1976, Dan went to the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, KS.

In 1977, Dan took his family to Yongsan, Korea, where he became a facility engineer, a career field he remained in for the rest of his time in the Army. In addition to work, he coached the base soccer team.

In 1979, he moved with his family to Fort Rucker, AL to complete a four-year stint as the facility engineer for the base. He continued his love of soccer, both coaching and participating. 

In 1983, the family moved to Heidelberg, Germany. Dan served as the chief of facilities (Engineering Division), Office of Deputy Chief of Staff, Engineer Headquarters, United States Army, Europe and Seventh Army. It was in Germany that Dan was able to enjoy his love of old cars. It started with a 1964 Mercedes convertible 230 SL and graduated to a 1935 Alvis Saloon, which he sold just a year before his death. Dan retired from the Army after 30 years and one month. Dan and Pam stayed in Germany, where Dan worked for Lockheed Martin and Pam took the sponsor lead working for DODDS. 

In 1997, Dan and Pam returned to the U.S., having spent a total of 15 years in Germany. The Barneys spent their retirement in Carlisle, PA. Dan volunteered at the Carlisle Theater Board for six years, the Carlisle Planning Commission for eight years, and as a volunteer tax preparer at Carlisle Barracks for 16 years. 

Dan and Pam continued to travel to the far ends of the earth, visiting places they had not yet been, including Russia and Egypt (both places to which Dan could never get a visa while in the Army). They also spent retirement attending every USMA reunion possible. Dan put together many trips for his K-1 Company.

Sadly, in the fall of 2020, Dan was in a freak accident that left him paralyzed from the neck down, unable to breathe without the help of a machine. His one concern when he was in the hospital was to ensure that his wife, Pam, who had suffered a stroke the year prior, would be taken care of. He is survived by his wife, Pam; his children, Scott and Liz; and his grandchildren: Allie, Cassandra and Azaria.